XML file that opens in Trados Studio as completely blank - problem with closing tags?

Hi there fellow Trados Studio users and SDL staff,

One of our customers has sent us an XML file they were given by an external agency that contains the text to appear in an interactive infographic.

Unfortunately, when loaded into Trados, the file appears completely empty. I'm pretty sure the problem lies with the XML, and perhaps a lack of "closing tags"?

None of the text to be translated shows up in black in Notepad++ either

Here's an excerpt:

Is there anything I can do to make it translatable? A quickish find and replace operation to add in closing tags perhaps?

Something tells me the entry   target=""   could perhaps be intended for the translation as it appears after each and every section of translation-relevant text.

Any pointers would be much appreciated!

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  • A few things...

    1. the possible translatable content all seems to be in attributes.  This is fine, but the default AnyXML will not pick these up  You have to create a custom XML filetype for this.
    2. target=""...I have no idea what this is for.  You need to ask your client.  I'd be surprised if this is for the target translation as there are least two attributes that contain possible translatable text (description and title), so where would you put these if the target is for it?

    I think you need to have a discussion with your client, ask them what's supposed to be translated and where the translatable text needs to be.  All easy to handle, but you should not be guessing.

  • Thanks, Paul.

    When creating the custom XML filetype, am I right in thinking it's the parser rules that I use to tell Trados to treat the "description" and "title" attributes as markers for translatable text? I've had a play around with it a little, but can't get Trados to recognise any text. I've had a brief look through the w3schools training stuff on XML, but I'm a bit lost, to be honest.

    It is just the stuff marked with "description" and "title" that needs to be translated. The customer is talking about manually copying and pasting over the German with English, but there must be a better solution. All their other translators have just sent the file back to them in a kind of "computer says no" fashion.

  • This article may be better for you as it's more relevant to how to use the tool to handle an XML file:

    https://multifarious.filkin.com/2014/06/01/custom-xml/

    It's pretty straightforward and if you provided a snippet of the file instead of a screenshot I could show you a better example of how to do this with your file.  But here's a quick example based on this snippet I created from the information you have shared:

    attributes.xml
    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
    <media>
      <hotspots>
        <hotspot skinid="ht_node" pan="262.71" title="Maschinekabinen" id="point28" tilt="11.23" description="Hier wird die Beschreibung eines Maschinenraums stehen." />
        <hotspot skinid="ht_node" pan="226.86" title="Motorenblock" id="point29" tilt="10.95" description="Der Motorblock unterstützt die im Maschinenraum auftretenden Kräfte." />
      </hotspots>
    </media>

    I used XML2 when I created the new XML filetype and I based this on using XPath rules as I prefer the flexibility this offers.  I then created three rules:

    //* (to tell Studio not to extract anything at all)

    //hotspot/@description (to extract text from the description attribute inside the hotspot element)

    //hotspot/@title (to extract text from the title attribute inside the hotspot element)

    Like this:

    The sample file I created now parses like this:

    All their other translators have just sent the file back to them in a kind of "computer says no" fashion.

    They either don't have Trados Studio or they don't know how to use it :-)

  • Once again, rides to the rescue!

    I'll definitely study that article of yours, Paul, but having added those XPath rules to the custom XML filetype I'd created, Studio has picked up all the text beautifully.

    To be honest, I suspect that the vast majority of Trados users don't have the faintest clue about this side of the software or the slightest intention of grappling with what many would perceive as something well beyond their remit that requires skills and knowledge they don't have and aren't interested in. 

    I'm just pig-headed and stubborn Wink

    Many, many thanks indeed for your assistance and explanations - over the years, I'm very slowly expanding my horizons!

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  • Once again, rides to the rescue!

    I'll definitely study that article of yours, Paul, but having added those XPath rules to the custom XML filetype I'd created, Studio has picked up all the text beautifully.

    To be honest, I suspect that the vast majority of Trados users don't have the faintest clue about this side of the software or the slightest intention of grappling with what many would perceive as something well beyond their remit that requires skills and knowledge they don't have and aren't interested in. 

    I'm just pig-headed and stubborn Wink

    Many, many thanks indeed for your assistance and explanations - over the years, I'm very slowly expanding my horizons!

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